Really Cool Nut Crackers by Monica Hossele are now an added to a new collection of custom made ChristmasLegendsSeries by Karla Steinbach and both are collaborating to explore new markets

You can now also get a DIY Nutcracker Kit and the 2 collections of both, Monica and Karla at bruceswoodworks. Or order your custom made Nutcracker from Monica’s collection or Karla’s collection through BruceWoodWorks.

Pic Via : BruceWoodWorks

Read More on How ‘Baby New Year’ was born By Lisa Rose, CNN

The Baby New Year is a personification of the start of the New Year commonly seen in editorial cartoons. He symbolizes the “birth” of the next year and the “passing” of the prior year; in other words, a “rebirth”. Baby New Year’s purpose varies by myth, but he generally performs some sort of ceremonial duty over the course of his year such as chronicling the year’s events or presiding over the year as a symbol.

The myth most associated with him is that he is a baby at the beginning of his year, but Baby New Year quickly ages until he is elderly (like Father Time, with whom he is often associated at the end of his year. Very rarely is the Baby New Year depicted as any age other than a baby or as a very old man. Some stories, especially those with depictions of years past, will have him bear a strong likeness to key events in his time. At this point, he hands over his duties to the next Baby New Year, while he either dies or remains in this state and retires.

Father Time is usually depicted as an elderly bearded man with wings, dressed in a robe and carrying a scythe and an hourglass or other timekeeping device (which represents time’s constant one-way movement, and more generally and abstractly, entropy). This image derives from several sources, including the Grim Reaper and the misattribution of Cronus (not Chronos) as the Greek Titan of human time, reaping and calendars, or the Lord of Time.

Around New Year’s Eve, the media use the convenient trope of Father Time as the personification of the previous year (or “the Old Year”) who typically “hands over” the duties of time to the equally allegorical Baby New Year (or “the New Year”) or who otherwise characterizes the preceding year. In these depictions, Father Time is usually depicted wearing a sash with the old year’s date on it.

According to German folklore, nutcrackers were given as keepsakes to bring good luck to your family and protect your home. The legend says that a nutcracker represents power and strength and serves like a trusty watch dog guarding your family from evil spirits and danger. A fierce protector, the nutcracker bares its teeth to the evil spirits and serves as the traditional messenger of good luck and goodwill.

“Don’t be afraid, my beard is long, my head is large, my look is grim but that matters not. I won’t bite you. In spite of my big mouth and grim appearance, I look with my heart for your happiness.”

•Nutcrackers embody the ‘Cycle of Life’, As the seed of a nut falls to the ground, it grows into a strong tree, living over hundreds of years nourishing the woodcutters and woodcrafters. The legends tell of a feast celebrated just before harvesting the logs of the Elder trees, where nuts and fruits were eaten as if to pass on the magic and mystery of this eternal cycle . . . and so on to the collectors of these exquisite wooden nutcrackers.

•Nutcrackers reflect ancestral dining customs where amusing or unusual nutcrackers were part of the social setting adding a whimsical conversation piece as guests lingered over the desert course which included sweetmeats such as pecans and hazelnuts.

“If you sit down under one of these trees you might hear the rush and rustle of the tops, telling you about the German legends and the history witnessed by these trees,” says Herr Steinbach.

THE STEINBACH FAMILY OF ARTISANS

The Differnce Between Lending in Goodwill and Investment :

When you lend in Goodwill you do not expect in return.

When you lend in Investment a return is expected.

Dear Lender,

A story as a reminder :

The Unforgiving Debtor

Therefore the Kingdom of Heaven is like a certain king, who wanted to reconcile accounts with his servants. When he had begun to reconcile, one was brought to him who owed him ten thousand talents. But because he couldn’t pay, his lord commanded him to be sold, with his wife, his children, and all that he had, and payment to be made. The servant therefore fell down and knelt before him, saying, ‘Lord, have patience with me, and I will repay you all!’ The lord of that servant, being moved with compassion, released him, and forgave him the debt.

“But that servant went out, and found one of his fellow servants, who owed him one hundred denarii, and he grabbed him, and took him by the throat, saying, ‘Pay me what you owe!’

“So his fellow servant fell down at his feet and begged him, saying, ‘Have patience with me, and I will repay you!’ He would not, but went and cast him into prison, until he should pay back that which was due. So when his fellow servants saw what was done, they were exceedingly sorry, and came and told to their lord all that was done. Then his lord called him in, and said to him, ‘You wicked servant! I forgave you all that debt, because you begged me. Shouldn’t you also have had mercy on your fellow servant, even as I had mercy on you?’ His lord was angry, and delivered him to the tormentors, until he should pay all that was due to him. So my heavenly Father will also do to you, if you don’t each forgive your brother from your hearts for his misdeeds.”

— Matthew 18:21-35, World English Bible

Warm Regards,

Borrower

The word dēnārius is derived from the Latin dēnī “containing ten”, as its value was 10 assēs, although in the middle of the 2nd century BC it was recalibrated so that it was now worth sixteen assēs or four sēstertiī. It is the origin of several modern words such as the currency name dinar; it is also the origin for the common noun for money in Italian denaro, in Portuguese dinheiro and in Spanish dinero. Its symbol is 𐆖 (X̶ a letter x with stroke).

The predecessor of the denarius was a Greek-styled silver coin, very similar to the didrachm and drachma struck in Metapontion and other Greek cities in southern Italy. These coins were inscribed for Rome but closely resemble their Greek counterparts. They were most likely used for trade purposes and were seldom used in Rome.

Pic Via Drachma in the Greek world

Ancient drachma in the Greek world

The name drachma is derived from the verb δράσσομαι (drássomai, “(I) grasp”). It is believed that the same word with the meaning of “handful” or “handle” is found in Linear B tablets of the Mycenean Pylos. Initially a drachma was a fistful (a “grasp”) (as much as one can hold in the hand) of six oboloí or obeloí (metal sticks, literally “spits”) used as a form of currency as early as 1100 BC and being a form of “bullion”: bronze, copper, or iron ingots denominated by weight. A hoard of over 150 rod-shaped obeloi was uncovered at Heraion of Argos in Peloponnese. Six of them are displayed at the Numismatic Museum of Athens.

It was the standard unit of silver coinage at most ancient Greek mints, and the name obol was used to describe a coin that was one-sixth of a drachma. The notion that drachma derived from the word for fistful was recorded by Herakleides of Pontos (387–312 BC) who was informed by the priests of Heraion that Pheidon, king of Argos, dedicated rod-shaped obeloi to Heraion. Similar information about Pheidon’s obeloi was also recorded at the Parian Chronicle.

The tetradrachm was an Ancient Greek silver coin equivalent to four drachmae. In Athens it replaced the earlier “heraldic” type of didrachms and it was in wide circulation from ca. 510 to ca. 38 BC

The transition from didrachms to tetradrachms occurred during ca. 525–510 BC; the abandonment of the “heraldic”-type didrachms and the Archaic tetradrachms (early “owls”) of the polis of Athens apparently took place shortly after the Battle of Salamis, 480 BC. This transition is supported by the discovery of contemporary coin hoards, and more particularly of a coin hoard found on the Acropolis in 1886.

The Athenian tetradrachm was widely used in transactions throughout the ancient Greek world, including in cities politically unfriendly to Athens. Athens had silver mines in state ownership, which provided the bullion. Most well known were the silver mines of Laurium at a close distance from Athens. The Athenian tetradrachm was stamped with the head of Athena on the obverse, and on the reverse the image of the owl of Athena, the iconographic symbol of the Athenian polis, with a sprig of olive and a crescent for the moon. According to Philochorus, it was known as glaux (little owl) throughout the ancient world and “owl” in present-day numismatics. The design was kept essentially unchanged for over two centuries, by which time it had become stylistically archaic. To differentiate their currency from the rival coinage of Aegina using the Aeginetic stater of about 12.3 grams, Athens minted its tetradrachm based on the “Attic” standard of 4.3 grams per drachma. The vast number of “owls-tetradrachms” available those days mainly from the silver mines of Laurium financed the several achievements of Athens, such as the reconstruction of the Acropolis and building the Parthenon, as well as many wars, including the Peloponnesian War.

The tetradrachm’s use as a currency was soon adopted by many other city-states of the ancient Greece, Asia Minor, Magna Grecia and other Greek colonial cities throughout the Mediterranean Sea. With the armies of Alexander the Great it spread to the Greek-influenced areas of present-day Iran and India.

Puranas, Karshapanas or Pana

Buy a very rare Silver Pana Here

X marks the Spot for ideas but T says the Arrow says move straight ahead to apply

Reads and References :

See Also :

Re-Export : If you can’t buy it from France you can buy it from New Zealand
Click here : Liquor mart

Everything about Chambord is sensational. The intrigue begins with its opaque appearance and extremely deep, purple colour. The liqueur has a luxuriously textured, medium-weight body and a wafting herbal and fruit bouquet. Black raspberries, vanilla acacia honey, and fragrant herbs steeped in cognac. The semi-sweet palate is a lavish affair featuring raspberries, spice, herbs and a taste of honey. The flavours persist on the palate for a remarkably long finish.

Region / Country: France

Variety: Liqueur

Alcohol: 16.5%

Drink Safely – Happy New Year !


(CC) 2016 Tysilyn Fernandez

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